Vol. 2, No. 10, 2007

Download this article
Download this article For screen
For printing
Recent Issues

Volume 12
Issue 3, 249–351
Issue 2, 147–247
Issue 1, 1–146

Volume 11, 5 issues

Volume 10, 5 issues

Volume 9, 5 issues

Volume 8, 8 issues

Volume 7, 10 issues

Volume 6, 9 issues

Volume 5, 6 issues

Volume 4, 10 issues

Volume 3, 10 issues

Volume 2, 10 issues

Volume 1, 8 issues

The Journal
Cover
Editorial Board
Research Statement
Scientific Advantage
Submission Guidelines
Submission Form
Subscriptions
Author Index
To Appear
 
ISSN: 1559-3959
Dynamic compression of square honeycomb structures during underwater impulsive loading

Haydn N. G. Wadley, Kumar P. Dharmasena, Doug T. Queheillalt, YungChia Chen, Philip Dudt, David Knight, Ken Kiddy, Zhenyu Xue and Ashkan Vaziri

Vol. 2 (2007), No. 10, 2025–2048
Abstract

Significant reductions in the fluid structure interaction regulated transfer of impulse occur when sandwich panels with thin (light) front faces are impulsively loaded in water. A combined experimental and computational simulation approach has been used to investigate this phenomenon during the compression of honeycomb core sandwich panels. Square cell honeycomb panels with a core relative density of 5% have been fabricated from 304 stainless steel. Back supported panels have been dynamically loaded in through thickness compression using an explosive sheet to create a plane wave impulse in water. As the impulse was increased, the ratio of transmitted to incident momentum decreased from the Taylor limit of 2, for impulses that only elastically deformed the core, to a value of 1.5, when the peak incident pressure caused inelastic core crushing. This reduction in transmitted impulse was slightly less than that previously observed in similar experiments with a lower strength pyramidal lattice core and, in both cases, was well above the ratio of 0.35 predicted for an unsupported front face. Core collapse was found to occur by plastic buckling under both quasistatic and dynamic conditions. The buckling occurred first at the stationary side of the core, and, in the dynamic case, was initiated by reflection of a plastic wave at the (rigid) back face sheet-web interface. The transmitted stress through the back face sheet during impulse loading depended upon the velocity of the front face, which was determined by the face sheet thickness, the magnitude of the impulse, and the core strength. When the impulse was sufficient to cause web buckling, the dynamic core strength increased with front face velocity. It rose from about 2 times the quasistatic value at a front face initial velocity of 35 m/s to almost 3 times the quasistatic value for an initial front face velocity of 104 m/s. The simulations indicate that this core hardening arises from inertial stabilization of the webs, which delays the onset of their buckling. The simulations also indicate that the peak pressure transmitted to a support structure from the water can be controlled by varying the core relative density. Pressure mitigation factors of more than an order of magnitude appear feasible using low relative density cores. The study reveals that for light front face sandwich panels the core strength has a large effect upon impulse transfer and the loading history applied to support structures.

Keywords
sandwich panels, honeycomb cores, impulse loading, cellular structures
Milestones
Received: 6 September 2007
Accepted: 6 September 2007
Published: 1 December 2007
Authors
Haydn N. G. Wadley
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Virginia
395 McCormick Road
Charlottesville VA 22904
United States
Kumar P. Dharmasena
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Virginia
395 McCormick Road
Charlottesville VA 22904
United States
Doug T. Queheillalt
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
University of Virginia
395 McCormick Road
Charlottesville VA 22904
United States
YungChia Chen
Naval Surface Warfare Center
Carderock Division
West Bethesda MD 20817
United States
Philip Dudt
Naval Surface Warfare Center
Carderock Division
West Bethesda MD 20817
United States
David Knight
Naval Surface Warfare Center
Carderock Division
West Bethesda MD 20817
United States
Ken Kiddy
Naval Surface Warfare Center
Indian Head Division
Indian Head MD 20640
United States
Zhenyu Xue
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard University
Cambridge MA 02138
United States
Ashkan Vaziri
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Harvard University
Cambridge MA 02138
United States