Vol. 4, No. 1, 2009

Download this article
Download this article For screen
For printing
Recent Issues

Volume 12
Issue 3, 249–351
Issue 2, 147–247
Issue 1, 1–146

Volume 11, 5 issues

Volume 10, 5 issues

Volume 9, 5 issues

Volume 8, 8 issues

Volume 7, 10 issues

Volume 6, 9 issues

Volume 5, 6 issues

Volume 4, 10 issues

Volume 3, 10 issues

Volume 2, 10 issues

Volume 1, 8 issues

The Journal
Cover
Editorial Board
Research Statement
Scientific Advantage
Submission Guidelines
Submission Form
Subscriptions
Author Index
To Appear
 
ISSN: 1559-3959
Comparative study of symmetric and asymmetric deformation of Al single crystal under microscale laser shock peening

Siniša Vukelić, Youneng Wang, Jeffrey W. Kysar and Y. Lawrence Yao

Vol. 4 (2009), No. 1, 89–105
Abstract

The process of laser shock peening induces compressive residual stresses in a material to improve material fatigue life. For micron sized laser beams, the size of the laser-target interaction zone is of the same order of magnitude as the target material grains and, thus, the target material must be considered anisotropic and inhomogeneous. Single crystals are chosen to study the effects of the anisotropic mechanical properties. It is of further interest to investigate the response of symmetric and asymmetric slip systems with respect to the shocked surface. In the present study, analytic, numerical, and experimental aspects of laser shock peening on two different crystal surfaces, (110) and (11̄4), of aluminum single crystals are studied. Anisotropic slip line theory is employed for the construction of slip line fields for both orientations and compared with numerical results. Lattice rotations of the cross section are measured using Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD).

Keywords
laser shock peening, single crystal, micromechanics, anisotropic slip line theory
Milestones
Received: 17 September 2008
Revised: 10 November 2008
Accepted: 13 November 2008
Published: 8 April 2009
Authors
Siniša Vukelić
Columbia University
Mechanical Engineering Department
500 W 120th Street, S. W. Mudd Building Room 220, MC 4703
New York, NY 10027
United States
Youneng Wang
Columbia University
Mechanical Engineering Department
500 W 120th Street, S. W. Mudd Building Room 220, MC 4703
New York, NY 10027
United States
Jeffrey W. Kysar
Columbia University
Mechanical Engineering Department
500 W 120th Street, S. W. Mudd Building Room 220, MC 4703
New York, NY 10027
United States
Y. Lawrence Yao
Columbia University
Mechanical Engineering Department
500 W 120th Street, S. W. Mudd Building Room 220, MC 4703
New York, NY 10027
United States