Vol. 5, No. 3, 2010

Download this article
Download this article For screen
For printing
Recent Issues

Volume 12
Issue 3, 249–351
Issue 2, 147–247
Issue 1, 1–146

Volume 11, 5 issues

Volume 10, 5 issues

Volume 9, 5 issues

Volume 8, 8 issues

Volume 7, 10 issues

Volume 6, 9 issues

Volume 5, 6 issues

Volume 4, 10 issues

Volume 3, 10 issues

Volume 2, 10 issues

Volume 1, 8 issues

The Journal
Cover
Editorial Board
Research Statement
Scientific Advantage
Submission Guidelines
Submission Form
Subscriptions
Author Index
To Appear
 
ISSN: 1559-3959
Dynamic compressive response of composite corrugated cores

Benjamin P. Russell, Adam Malcom, Haydn N. G. Wadley and Vikram S. Deshpande

Vol. 5 (2010), No. 3, 477–493
Abstract

The dynamic out-of-plane compressive response of E-glass composite corrugated sandwich cores have been measured for impact velocities ranging from quasistatic to 175ms-1. Laboratory scale sandwich cores of relative density ρ̄ 33% were manufactured from 3D woven E-glass and stitched to S2-glass face-sheets via a double line of Kevlar yarn. Two variants of the sandwich cores were investigated: sandwich cores with the empty spaces between the corrugations filled with a PVC foam, and unfilled corrugations. The stresses on the rear faces of the dynamically compressed sandwich cores were measured using a direct impact Kolsky bar. The compression tests on both the corrugated cores and the parent strut wall material confirmed that these relatively high relative density corrugated cores failed by microbuckling of the strut wall material under quasistatic loading. Moreover, the foam filling did not have any significant effect on the measured responses. The peak stresses of both the strut wall material and corrugated cores increased approximately linearly with strain rate for applied strain rates less than about 4000s-1. This increase was attributed to the strain rate sensitivity of the composite matrix material that stabilised the microbuckling failure mode of the E-glass composite. At higher applied strain rates the response was reasonably rate insensitive with compressive crushing of the glass fibres being the dominant failure mode. A simple model utilising the measured dynamic properties of the strut wall material accurately predicts the measured peak strengths of the filled and unfilled corrugated cores.

Keywords
composite lattice cores, impact testing, dynamic loads, material rate-dependence
Milestones
Received: 21 October 2009
Revised: 8 March 2010
Accepted: 14 March 2010
Published: 15 October 2010
Authors
Benjamin P. Russell
University of Cambridge
Engineering Department
Trumpington Street
Cambridge
CB2 1PZ
United Kingdom
Adam Malcom
University of Virginia
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Charlottesville, VA 22904
United States
Haydn N. G. Wadley
University of Virginia
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
Charlottesville, VA 22904
United States
Vikram S. Deshpande
University of Cambridge
Engineering Department
Trumpington Street
Cambridge
CB2 1PZ
United Kingdom