Vol. 8, No. 5-7, 2013

Download this article
Download this article. For screen
For printing
Recent Issues

Volume 12
Issue 3, 249–351
Issue 2, 147–247
Issue 1, 1–146

Volume 11, 5 issues

Volume 10, 5 issues

Volume 9, 5 issues

Volume 8, 8 issues

Volume 7, 10 issues

Volume 6, 9 issues

Volume 5, 6 issues

Volume 4, 10 issues

Volume 3, 10 issues

Volume 2, 10 issues

Volume 1, 8 issues

The Journal
Cover
Editorial Board
Research Statement
Scientific Advantage
Submission Guidelines
Submission Form
Subscriptions
Author Index
To Appear
 
ISSN: 1559-3959
Efficiencies of algorithms for vibration-based delamination detection: A comparative study

Obinna K. Ihesiulor, Krishna Shankar, Zhifang Zhang and Tapabrata Ray

Vol. 8 (2013), No. 5-7, 247–281
Abstract

The need for efficient and low-cost techniques adequate for damage detection has become of great interest in engineering applications where structural health monitoring (SHM) is of paramount importance. Promising algorithms for SHM have to deliver results with very low computational and response time requirements and be trustworthy within a certain accuracy. Different algorithms (artificial neural networks (ANN), response surface methodology (RSM), and optimization techniques — gradient-based local search (GBLS) and nondominated sorting genetic algorithms (NSGA-II)) are proposed to fill this research gap. The concept of a surrogate model as a fast-executing model is also introduced. Because the objective of this paper is to concentrate on viable techniques suitable for damage detection using vibration methods with very low computational requirements, surrogates are therefore employed to curtail the computational expense. Particularly of interest among the proposed algorithms is RSM, the principle of which has proved successful in the pharmaceuticals industry over the years. However, RSM has not been so widely used in the field of structural engineering for delamination detection. In this paper, we have demonstrated that a fourth-order polynomial has the capability to detect delaminations in composite structures. In order to reduce the size of training data required to solve the inverse problem by the proposed algorithms, the idea of a suitable design space is brought to the limelight as the combination of all possible simulations that one is concerned about. Since the overall sum of design space is usually prohibitively large, we have used K-means clustering to effectively achieve this. This research concerns the application of ANN, RSM, and optimization techniques for delamination detection using changes in natural frequencies before and after damage. Efficiencies of algorithms (ANN, GBLS, and NSGA-II) are compared with the developed RSM models in terms of the accuracy of delamination detection and response time requirements. The methods have been shown to compete effectively for delamination detection and are accurate in detecting the size and locations of delaminations at midplanes. RSM has a unique feature in that it produces models with a small training dataset requirement and also generates mathematical models that are easy to interpret and implement. The optimization techniques, when integrated with surrogate models, require small training sets clustered through the entire design space. ANN, however, requires large training datasets to achieve its results. As such, the potential of these algorithms as tools for on-board damage detection when integrated into a SHM system is successfully demonstrated.

Keywords
vibrations, delaminations, ANN, K-means clustering, surrogates, RSM, optimization techniques
Milestones
Received: 1 November 2012
Accepted: 13 January 2013
Published: 18 November 2013
Authors
Obinna K. Ihesiulor
School of Engineering and Information Technology
University of New South Wales at the Australian Defense Force Academy
Northcott Drive
Canberra ACT 2600
Australia
Krishna Shankar
School of Engineering and Information Technology
University of New South Wales at the Australian Defense Force Academy
Northcott Drive
Canberra ACT 2600
Australia
Zhifang Zhang
School of Engineering and Information Technology
University of New South Wales at the Australian Defense Force Academy
Northcott Drive
Canberra ACT 2600
Australia
Tapabrata Ray
School of Engineering and Information Technology
University of New South Wales at the Australian Defense Force Academy
Northcott Drive
Canberra ACT 2600
Australia