Vol. 15, No. 1, 2020

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Expansion-contraction behavior of a pressurized porohyperelastic spherical shell due to fluid redistribution in the structure wall

Vahid Zamani and Thomas J. Pence

Vol. 15 (2020), No. 1, 159–184
Abstract

Spherical shells with porohyperelastic walls that contain mobile liquid are examined for the purpose of determining how the in-wall liquid distribution affects the overall mechanical response. Attention is restricted to spherical symmetry and to Mooney–Rivlin type material models that are generalized so as to incorporate swelling. In this setting, different distributions of the same amount of liquid are examined for their effect on the sphere’s pressure-expansion behavior. Liquid distributions that are essentially uniform are found to give the most compliant response. In contrast, nonuniform liquid distributions that concentrate liquid near either the inner or outer wall are found to stiffen the overall behavior. Liquid redistribution can also alter the basic monotonicity properties of the resulting inflation graphs, possibly leading to various limited burst events.

Keywords
swelling, liquid redistribution, shell stiffness, burst, porohyperelastic
Milestones
Received: 20 August 2019
Revised: 31 December 2019
Accepted: 10 January 2020
Published: 26 February 2020
Authors
Vahid Zamani
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Michigan State University
Engieering Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1226
United States
Thomas J. Pence
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Michigan State University
Engineering Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1226
United States